Although West Africa contributes to a good number of the African-Americans; most of them are believed to be immigrants from other parts of Africa as well as Caribbean, where African ancestors were sent as slaves. Since the end of Second World War, America has experienced a large number of emigrants from the African countries.

Most of these have gone to America in the name seeking further education, better employment opportunities and live or paying a visit to their American relatives and friends. Some of them end up engaging in relationships with the Americans, resulting to birth of African-American off springs who definitely becomes American citizens (Martin, 2004, p.19).

Other African emigrants become American citizen through registration. They end up producing African-American off springs with the original American. These families extend their relationships to their friends in Africa, still creating another generation of African-Americans. Americans living outside America especially in Africa have been involved in social relationships with African citizens in the countries they live in.

They start families with these Africans hence their off springs become American citizens. Their spouses also become American citizens unless their American partners change their citizenship. Some of them end up immigrating to America and start their families their.

Another significant number of Americans with African ancestry comes from the Caribbean countries who were major recipients of the African slaves facilitated by French, Britain and the Dutch. A significant number of these slaves were captured from Eastern Africa.

Their decedents have born children with the Caribbean originals bringing a generation of African-Caribbean some of who have migrated to America and started families with both the African-American and original Americans. All of these people have contributed to a large population of African-Americans than their counterparts who came from West Africa only (Martin, 2004, p.68).

References

Martin, H. M. (2004). Brown gold: Milestone of African American children’s picture

            books, 1845-2002. London: Routledge