WHILE AT THE ORPHANAGE, OLIVER EXPERIENCED A GREAT AMOUNT OF ABUSE. FOR EXAMPLE, WHILE SUFFERING FROM STARVATION AND MALNUTRITION FOR A LONG PERIOD OF TIME, OLIVER WAS CHOSEN BY THE OTHER BOYS AT THE ORPHANAGE TO REQUEST MORE GRUEL AT DINNER ONE NIGHT. AFTER MAKING THIS SIMPLE REQUEST, THE MASTER (AT THE ORPHANAGE) AIMED A BLOW AT OLIVER’S HEAD WITH THE LADLE; PIN DOWN HIM IN HIS ARMS; AND SHRIEKED ALOUD FOR THE BEADLE. CHARLES DICKENS NOVEL, OLIVER TWIST, CENTRES ITSELF ON THE LIFE OF THE YOUNG, ORPHAN OLIVER, BUT HE IS NOT A DEEPLY DEVELOPED CHARACTER.

HE STAYS THE SAME THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE NOVEL. HE HAS A DESIRE TO BE PROTECTED, HE WANTS TO BE IN A SAFE AND SECURE ENVIRONMENT, AND HE SHOWS UNCONDITIONAL LOVE AND ACCEPTANCE TO THE PEOPLE AROUND HIM. THESE ARE THE ONLY CHARACTER TRAITS THAT THE READER KNOWS OF OLIVER. HE IS AN ARCHETYPE OF GOODNESS AND INNOCENCE. HIS INNOCENCE DRAWS MANY PEOPLE CLOSE TO HIM. EACH CHARACTER IS ATTRACTED TO HIS INNOCENCE FOR DIFFERENT REASONS, SOME TO DESTROY IT AND OTHERS TO BUILD IT. THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH OLIVER REVEAL NOTHING MORE ABOUT HIS PERSONALITY.


THEY REVEAL MORE ABOUT THEIR OWN PERSONALITIES. THEREFORE, OLIVER IS USED NOT AS THE PROTAGONIST OF THE STORY, BUT AS THE ANCHOR FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE OTHER CHARACTERS. We know that this is not his complete truth of the whole meeting. But Fagin, being a crafty one, sought to silence Nancy through Bill Sikes, with, unforeseeable results. Fagin uses half-truths to manipulate Bill Sikes emotions, which causes him to destroy Nancy, which in turn leads to the destruction of the whole gang. Fagin, for all his craftiness and wile, causes his own downfall.

In his attempt to silence Nancy by using Bill Sikes, has sets in motion events that brings him and his gang down. With Nancy’s death, the promise of protection that was given to the rest of the gang at Nancy’s request was broken. As we have seen, the destructive nature of this character turns in against himself. Fagin brings about his own downfall. It has been said that evil brings about its own destruction. Fagin draws out every detail of Nancy’s conversation from Noah. But he doesn’t mention her desire to protect everyone but the fact that she chose to return to Sikes rather than be rescued.

Sikes rushes from the room in a frenzy of rage. Fagin stops the robber briefly on the stairs to ask a loaded question: “You won’t be_ too_ violent, Bill? ” Sikes and he exchange meaningful looks and Fagin modifies his comment: “I mean not too violent for safety. ” With a terrifying singleness of purpose and a savage passion Sikes heads home. Remember the violent crimes he’s committed before, and remember how many times Fagin has informed on other accomplices who weren’t useful any more. Nancy is different towards Sikes and Fagin. Nancy is pleased when Sikes returns. This makes his bloody murder of her even more chilling.

Nancy begs for her life. She clutches desperately at him, trying to make him understand that she chose to stay with him. Brownlow will rescue them both, she promises, and they can find new lives. But her pleas are useless. Sikes is beyond reason. Sikes knows he’ll be discovered if he fires his gun, so instead he smashes her face with it. Dying, the girl tries to pray. She holds up the white handkerchief Rose has given her. But Sikes strikes her down with his club. Rose Maylie’s Handkerchief, shows that Rose is a symbol of good in this book with her loving nature and perfect beauty.

When she gives Nancy her handkerchief, and when Nancy holds it up as she dies, it shows that by her acts, Nancy has gone over to the “good” side against the thieves. Her position on the ground is as if she is in prayer, and this shows her godly or good nature. The description of the morning after Nancy’s murder is graphic and dreadful. The apartment is a total mess. Even the dog’s feet are bloody. The darkness that shrouded London’s underworld until now is suddenly replaced by brilliant sunlight. Many readers think the reason Dickens uses sunlight here is to suggest that such dreadful evil will be uncovered and exposed.

Sikes tries to draw the curtain to block out the light from the grisly scene in the room. But he can’t do it, any more than he will be able to prevent what happens to him. Sikes can’t control his own emotions. Inside the room he is careful never to turn his back on the corpse with its haunting eyes. Naila Parveen LC Page 1 of 4 Oliver Twist/ fatal consequences Show preview only The above preview is unformatted text This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Oliver Twist section.