The current study focused on the Stroop effect, which is the observation that it takes longer to name the colour of the ink in which a word is printed if the word spells a different colour than it does to identify a block of colour, It involves the use of automatic and controlled processes. The Stroop effect was tested on participants who were part of a repeated measures groups design, there were two males and two females aged between 14-16 years from Cathedral College Wangaratta. The results obtained state that when the participants were required to visually process incongruent information, they took longer and made more errors.

Future research should focus on working with a larger sample size in order to gain stronger results. Controlled processes are the processing of information which involves conscious, alert awareness and mental effort in which the individual actively focuses their attention on achieving a particular goal, controlled processes are often required when an activity is difficult or unfamiliar (Grivas, et al, 2010). Automatic processes require little conscious awareness and mental effort and are used when an activity is easy or familiar (Grivas, et al, 2010). J.

Ridley Stroop (1935) found that participants were slower to perform a task and made more errors when they were asked to visually process incongruent information, this is information which is conflicting (Grivas, et al, 2010). Participants had difficulty naming the colour of the ink if the word was different to the colour. This is now known as the Stroop effect and is the observation that it takes longer to name the colour of the ink in which a word is printed if the word spells a different colour than it does to identify a block of colour (Grivas, et al, 2010).

In the current study, it is predicted that participants will take more time and make more mistakes when they are required to visually process incongruent information, compared to when they are presented with congruent information and very few mistakes are made and in a much quicker time. Participants were recruited from Cathedral College Wangaratta on the basis of convenience and were required to stand approximately 5 meters away from the screen and read out the word, colour of ink or colour of block which they were presented with.

Participants: Participants were part of a repeated measures groups design where each participated in the four conditions. Two males and two females aged between 14-16 years from Cathedral College Wangaratta were involved. Materials: Data recording sheet – Refer to appendix 1 Projector Slide show with the conditions on each slide Design: IV: Incongruent words and familiar words. DV: Time taken and errors reported to respond to stimuli. Procedure: 1. Researchers asked participant if they were colour blind

2. Researchers asked participant to stand a certain distance away from the projector 3. At the start of each condition, researchers explained to the participant that they were to read aloud either the word or the colour of the ink depending on the condition. In condition 1 there were colour words in black print and the participant was required to read the word printed in black. In condition 2 there were incongruent colour words and the participant was required to state the colour of the ink.

In condition 3 there were blocks of colours and the participant was required to state the colour of the block and in condition 4 there were familiar words in colour print and the participant was required to state the colour of the ink. 4. Participant read out either the word or the colour of the ink, depending on which condition they were completing. 5. After each condition was completed, the researchers recorded the data. Discussion: The results from the current study supported the hypothesis which stated that it is predicted that participants in the experiment will have a longer reaction time and more errors when the font were incongruent.

Limitations of the experiment are that the participants were all of a similar age, also having a small sample size means that the results are not as accurate as they could be. The results obtained state that when the participants were required to visually process incongruent information, they took longer and made more errors. Future research should focus on working with a larger sample size and a broad age bracket in order to gain stronger results References: